Frequently Asked Questions

Q: What do I do if I am injured as the result of someone else's accidental or negligent act or failure to act?

A: Many people find themselves in the unfortunate position of being the victim of someone else's actions or failures to act. The repercussions of these incidents go beyond mere physical or emotion injury, and often impact a person's financial well-being, too. If you have suffered from the negligent or intentional act of another person or business, you should keep the following in mind:

  • Seek medical attention right away, even if you don't think you are badly injured — leave it up to the doctor to diagnose you
  • Keep a record of conversations with the person or business that caused your injuries,
  • Truthfully but briefly answer questions from the police and your own insurance company but do not give lengthy statements to anyone, including other insurance companies, without legal counsel.
  • Contact an attorney right away — you need someone working to protect your rights as soon as possible.

Q: What do I do if I am arrested by the police?

A: Being arrested for a crime means that the police have probable cause to indicate that you have committed, were committing or were about to commit a violation of the criminal laws; it does not mean that you are guilty. Under most circumstances, you are entitled to assert constitutional rights immediately upon the police detaining you. If you have been detained or suspect that the police are investigating you for violating the law, tell the police that you want to talk to your attorney before you make any statements, and contact an attorney right away.

Q: When is it better to settle versus take a case to trial in a civil dispute?

A: Even if you have a solid case, you could potentially spend much more on legal fees than you would save or obtain in a trial. An experienced attorney can evaluate your case, weigh all factors and advise you on a way toward resolution that is truly in your best interests. This may mean settling through negotiations or it may mean mediation, arbitration or a trial. Understanding potential risks and benefits is vital. Contact a lawyer to explore your opportunities, liabilities and options.

Q: How should I prepare for an administrative hearing with a school board, DCFS or a homeowners association?

A: Gathering all documentation and testimony related to the matter in question is fundamental. Educating yourself on rules, regulations and procedures that may affect your case is also important. Administrative law matters may affect you long term. It is in your best interests to work with a lawyer who can help you develop a strategy positioning yourself for success.

Q: How can I get answers to my own questions?

Contact the attorneys of Ekl Williams & Provenzale LLC at 630-366-0837 or through this website to request a case review with no further obligation.